St. Louis Lags on Green Transportation

I read two different but equally alarming stories this morning.

The St. Louis Post Dispatch reports on a 40-year local transportation plan developed by St. Louis county officials. There was no mention of metro link expansion, car pool lanes or any kind of green transportation.  None at all.  Officials are putting together a plan for road improvements 40 years out but see no need to include environmentally-friendly forms of travel and commuting.

The second story I read was a New York Times Green story highlights the growing problem of a decreasing oil supply.  HSBC, a British bank, warns that the world’s remaining oil supplies can will only last for another 50 years or less.  As the auto industry grows and spreads to more countries, namely third world countries, the demand for oil grows.

I did learn one thing in my Microeconomics course: When supply goes down, demand goes up.  When demand is going up because of another issue altogether, prices are going to rise.  They’re going to rise fast.

As St. Louis ignores green transportation altogether, the world’s experts and officials warn of decreasing oil supplies and consequent gas price rises.

Does anyone else see a problem with this?

St. Louis county, heck and city, need to start thinking about green transportation for its residents now.  Personally, I vote for the metro link to expand further into the county to provide city commuters a greener option. Unfortunately, county officials don’t think this is a top priority.

What do you think?  Are you more concerned about the conditions of the roads you drive every day than the environment?  How do you feel about the county’s overlooking of green transportation in their 40-year plan?  Do you just think I’m a liberal hippie?  Let me know in the comments below–I’m interested in what you have to say.

3 Comments
  • katie
    March 31, 2011

    This is so sad. Why do they need a highway between South County and the airport? Have they been to the airport lately? There’s nothing going on there, ever.

    Where’s the money coming from?

    This is the problem right here: “Some of them, such as promoting sustainability and adapting roads and transit to users of alternative fuels, are relatively new ideas for transportation planners.” New ideas?! Maybe MODOT needs to focus on hiring transportation planners that are more forward thinking that that!

    And I love how the only mention of expanding Metrolink is from St. Louis City to North County. Awesome, STL…

    So I heard another acronym floating around that you might like that is similar to NIMBY: BANANA – Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anyone! I think that might accurately sum up how St. Louis County feels about Metrolink. What do you think?

  • katie
    March 31, 2011

    Oh and PS – you should see what the entirety of LoDo looks like right now to prepare for the light rail expansion. It is like they should put a huge orange construction cone over the entirety of Union Station and the 3 block radius that surrounds it. Right now from my building I’m watching them drill a 10 foot+ hole down the middle of 16th street between Wynkoop and Wewatta. It’s become perilous for me to walk from the building one block down to the light rail with all the construction trucks and heavy machinery and workers with slow/stop signs! 🙂

    I am like a kid with an ice cream cone I’m so excited about it. And proud. You should move back.

    http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/dus_1

  • Bob Ubriaco
    April 1, 2011

    St. Louis has historically lagged behind, as the recent controversy regarding the presence of young African Americans at the Galleria indicated, in the development of public transportation due to city official’s desire to keep certain neighborhoods segregated. It is yet another example of how short sighted and potentially damaging racial politics can be for the future of any community. If we do not develop alternative forms of travel soon, we are either going to have to be willing to walk or learn to ride a horse.

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